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Easy Sourdough Pasta Recipe

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This rustic handmade pasta recipe is a great use of sourdough discard. With a slight sourdough tang and a nice chewy bite, this rustic sourdough pasta is a fun recipe you can use to make any shape of pasta you want.
a pile of sourdough pasta noodles on marble

This sourdough pasta is so easy to make, and only needs three ingredients and no special equipment! With a slight sourdough tang and a great texture, this recipe is easily adaptable to any recipe that calls for pasta!


Handmade pasta is such a fun treat. I love calling these rustic, artisan, hand cut noodles. These noodles have a subtle sourdough flavor that helps to deepen 

Other easy sourdough discard recipes:

handmade sourdough pasta noodles hanging on wooden spoon

How to make sourdough pasta dough

What I love most about this recipe is that it is so easy to make! For the full recipe and directions, please scroll down to the recipe card below. 

These directions are for rolling and cutting the pasta by hand. If you have a pasta roller, you can definitely use that as well! 

  1. Place the flour, starter, and eggs into the bowl of your stand mixer.
  2. Place the dough hook on the stand mixer and mix on low until the dough comes together. It could take a full five minutes. The dough should feel silky, bounce back if you pinch it and be slightly sticky/tacky but not too much. If you touch it, a little dough should stick to your fingers but you should be still able to handle it fairly easily. Go by feel for this recipe. If the dough is too dry, you can add 1 Tablespoon of water to achieve the right consistency. If the dough is too wet, add 1 Tablespoon of flour at a time until the dough is right. 
  3. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and allow to sit on the counter for at least 30 minutes, or up to two hours. The dough won’t rise. If you want a more pronounced sourdough flavor, you can leave it on the counter for an hour or two and then cover and refrigerate for up to 24 hours.

*A Note on salt: We are not adding salt to this recipe as salt will prevent the flour from absorbing some liquid and will change the texture of the dough. Cooking the pasta in salted boiling water helps add the flavor. 

collage showing steps to make sourdough pasta

How to roll and cut handmade sourdough pasta

  1. Flour your counter and place the dough on your counter.
  2. Divide the dough into four equal portions.
  3. Working with one portion of dough at a time, roll the dough as thin as you can. Make sure you keep picking up the dough, re-flouring your counter as needed, and turning the dough over, so it doesn’t stick to your counter. Use your rolling pin lightly – don’t push and smash the dough into the counter or it will be more likely to stick. THe dough should be easy to roll out, as long as you are being light and making sure you are keeping the counter floured.
  4. Using a sharp knife or a pizza cutter, cut your pasta into even strips. Don’t cut them too thin or it will be hard to pick up and they will be more likely to tear.
  5. Carefully pick up the pasta strands and hang them up to dry. You can hang them over a wooden spoon suspended between two glasses, or a clean broom handle suspended over two chairs, or you can even place them on a cooling rack. They just need to be separated and have some air flow to dry and not stick together.
  6. Repeat with the remaining sections of dough.
  7. When all the pasta has been cut, you can cook it or dry and store it for later.
collage showing how to roll and cut sourdough pasta

How to cook fresh sourdough pasta noodles

  1. Start a large pot of salted water on high heat. 
  2. When the water is boiling, add the pasta to the water. Cook, stirring frequently, for 3-5 minutes. If your noodles are thinner they will require less time, and if they are thicker they will require more time. 
  3. Drain the noodles and eat as desired!
bowl of freshly cooked sourdough pasta noodles

What kind of sourdough starter does this recipe need?

This recipe uses 100 % hydration sourdough starter. You can use sourdough discard or fed and active sourdough starter for this recipe. Make sure you read up on feeding your sourdough starter the easy way!

Note: Every starter is different – some are more dry, some are more wet, and sometimes each starter behaves in its own way. Altitude and weather can also play a role in how this recipe comes together. If you need to add a little more flour or water to adjust the texture of the dough, please do so.

What kind of flour should I use?

For this recipe, I use unbleached all purpose flour. You can also use some whole wheat flour in place of the all purpose.

Can I make other shapes of pasta with this recipe?

Yes! This sourdough pasta recipe works well for any shape of pasta. It can be used to make ravioli, rustic noodles, or any shape that you can make.

How long does the pasta need to dry?

That depends. If you are planning on cooking all of the pasta and eating it right away, it only needs to hang while you get your boiling water ready. 

If you want to store your sourdough noodles for later, you need to let it hang until it feels completely dry. How long that takes depends on the temperature and humidity level of your house.

How to store this pasta

When your sourdough pasta noodles are completely dry, you can place them in a ziploc bag, remove all the excess air, and place in the fridge for up to 3 days.

You can also freeze these noodles to save for later. Take the fresh, dried noodles and lay them flat on a cookie sheet. Place the cookie sheet in the freezer for about an hour. Then transfer the frozen noodles to a freezer safe container and store for up to 6 months. To reheat the noodles, add them straight from the freezer to boiling water for 8-10 minutes.

side view of pile of freshly made sourdough pasta noodles on marble

Serve these sourdough noodles with :

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rolling sourdough pasta with drying racks in background
Yield: 6 servings

Rustic Sourdough Pasta, of all shapes

a pile of sourdough pasta noodles on marble

This easy sourdough pasta is the perfect homemade and rustic recipe - just a few ingredients is all you need!

Prep Time 3 hours
Cook Time 3 minutes
Total Time 3 hours 3 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup 100% hydration sourdough starter discard
  • 1.5 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 eggs

Instructions

  1. Place the flour, starter, and eggs into the bowl of your stand mixer.
  2. Place the dough hook on the stand mixer and mix on low until the dough comes together. It could take a full five minutes. The dough should feel silky, bounce back if you pinch it and be slightly sticky/tacky but not too much. If you touch it, a little dough should stick to your fingers but you should be still able to handle it fairly easily. Go by feel for this recipe. If the dough is too dry, you can add 1 Tablespoon of water to achieve the right consistency. If the dough is too wet, add 1 Tablespoon of flour at a time until the dough is right.
  3. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and allow to sit on the counter for at least 30 minutes, or up to two hours. The dough won’t rise. If you want a more pronounced sourdough flavor, you can leave it on the counter for an hour or two and then cover and refrigerate for up to 24 hours.
  4. Flour your counter and place the dough on your counter.
  5. Divide the dough into four equal portions.
  6. Working with one portion of dough at a time, roll the dough as thin as you can. Make sure you keep picking up the dough, re-flouring your counter as needed, and turning the dough over, so it doesn't stick to your counter. Use your rolling pin lightly - don’t push and smash the dough into the counter or it will be more likely to stick. THe dough should be easy to roll out, as long as you are being light and making sure you are keeping the counter floured.
  7. Using a sharp knife or a pizza cutter, cut your pasta into even strips. Don’t cut them too thin or it will be hard to pick up and they will be more likely to tear.
  8. Carefully pick up the pasta strands and hang them up to dry. You can hang them over a wooden spoon suspended between two glasses, or a clean broom handle suspended over two chairs, or you can even place them on a cooling rack. They just need to be separated and have some air flow to dry and not stick together.
  9. Repeat with the remaining sections of dough.
  10. When all the pasta has been cut, you can cook it or dry and store it for later.Start a large pot of salted water on high heat.
  11. When the water is boiling, add the pasta to the water. Cook, stirring frequently, for 3-5 minutes. If your noodles are thinner they will require less time, and if they are thicker they will require more time.
  12. Drain the noodles and eat as desired!

Notes

If you are planning on cooking all of the pasta and eating it right away, it only needs to hang while you get your boiling water ready. If you want to store your sourdough noodles for later, you need to let it hang until it feels completely dry. How long that takes depends on the temperature and humidity level of your house.

When your sourdough pasta noodles are completely dry, you can place them in a ziploc bag, remove all the excess air, and place in the fridge for up to 3 days. You can also freeze these noodles to save for later. Take the fresh, dried noodles and lay them flat on a cookie sheet. Place the cookie sheet in the freezer for about an hour. Then transfer the frozen noodles to a freezer safe container and store for up to 6 months. To reheat the noodles, add them straight from the freezer to boiling water for 8-10 minutes.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

4

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 260Total Fat: 3gSaturated Fat: 1gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 2gCholesterol: 93mgSodium: 37mgCarbohydrates: 47gFiber: 2gSugar: 0gProtein: 10g

Nutrition information is an estimate and is provided for informational purposes only. For the most accurate information, please calculate using your specific brands and exact measurements.

Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Instagram, and don't forget to tag #gingeredwhisk.

freshly made pasta drying on rack with child\'s hand reaching up to grab a piece
plate of homemade pasta with Alfredo sauce on top
homemade pasta being rolled into ravioli and balls of cheese filling
homemade sourdough pasta drying on racks
sheet of dough being cut with pizza cutter into pasta strips
freshly made ravioli with red sauce and cheese

One of my favorite things since joining the food blogging community is not only the vast amount of new food that I have been exposed to, but also the great relationships that I have made! One such friendship is with Shelley of C Mom Cook. Even though we have never actually met in person I count her as one of my good friends, and we talk every few days. One such evening we were chatting and I mentioned a recipe I had found for homemade noodles made with a sourdough starter. Shelley (who loves her starter as much as I love mine) immediately thought it would be fun if we did the recipe together! Since neither of us could drive a few hours for some noodle making, we made the recipes in our own kitchens and are posting about it together!

The first attempt at sourdough pasta was slightly disastrous. I tried doing it by hand, but this dough is very dry, and even after kneading it by hand for 30 minutes it was all crumbs. By this time my arms were exhausted. Even after a spin cycle in the stand mixer it was too dry, so I threw it out and started all over. I also decided that even though the original recipe called for the yolk only that I would just go ahead and throw the whole egg in.

The second batch worked great, and I highly highly recommend using your mixer!! I decided to make a ravioli for this batch, and whipped up a simple filling of ricotta, garlic, and spinach. The dough was very easy to roll and cut, but I learned I need to work on my ravioli making skills. It’s a little…rustic. Haha. The slight twang of sourdough is definitely present here but not overpowering and went really well with the filling and marinara- we liked it!

The next batch was just straight noodles, and as much as we liked the filled pasta I think the plain noodles were our favorite. They are simple and rustic, and being fresh they cook up super fast (just a few minutes in boiling water is all it takes). I really enjoyed the noodles with red sauce, but Joel said he liked the alfredo best. Ladybug gives both sauces a clean plate, so you will just have to make the decision for yourself! 🙂

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